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July, 2014

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

No Child Hungry

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Children ages 18 yrs and younger may receive a free lunch at Laman Library M-F.

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Science just got cooler with "Cryo Lab" (Argenta Branch Library)

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Science just got cooler; and by cooler we mean freezing! Cryo Lab, a new Museum of Discovery program, explores cryogenics--the study of the production and effects of very low temperatures (below 150 degree, -238 F) Students will experiment with dry ice, witness the phase change of sublimation, experience the reaction that occurs when metal meets dry ice an more cool (literally) cryo experiments.

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Astrology!

Jul
23

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Darrell Heath is back to show us some amazing things about our universe with his planetarium!

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

No Child Hungry

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Children 18 yrs and younger may receive a free breakfast at Laman Library M-F

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Babytime

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Babies, ages 6 months to 2 years, and their caretakers will enjoy stories, songs, and fingerplays.

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Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

No Child Hungry

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Children ages 18 yrs and younger may receive a free lunch at Laman Library M-F.

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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Kids Bingo (Argenta Branch Library)

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

This friendly game is for children to have fun, bingo and win a little prize.

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CREATIVE PLAY TIME

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Come play at your library: bingo, blocks, puzzles and more!

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Krav Maga Self Defense Class

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Learn the basics of Krav Maga! Must be 12-18 to participte

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Janis F, Kearney: "Sundays with TJ"

Jul
24

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Come spend an evening with Janis F. Kearney as she discusses her new book "Sundays with TJ". Come hear about her father's life which began 40 years after the abolishment of slavery and lasted to 107 years of age in the atypical southern town of Lake Village, Arkansas.

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

KID'S MOVIES

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

Join us for movie time at 10am and 2pm.
Space Chimps at 10 AM, & Scoobys Laff-A-Lympics at 2 PM

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Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Teen Gaming

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

Join us for a day of gaming on the PS3 and Wii! Must have a library card and be between the ages of 12-18 to participate!

More Info

No Child Hungry

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

Children 18 yrs and younger may receive a free breakfast at Laman Library M-F

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

No Child Hungry

Jul
25

Friday, July 25, 2014

Children ages 18 yrs and younger may receive a free lunch at Laman Library M-F.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Teen Gaming

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Join us for a day of gaming on the PS3 and Will. Must have a library card and be between the ages of 12-18 to participate.

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

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ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

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Tabletop Gaming

Jul
26

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Join us every 4th Saturday in the Argenta Branch auditorium for an afternoon of tabletop gaming! Featuring classic, adventure, role playing, card, strategy games, and much more! Ages 13+.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
27

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
27

Sunday, July 27, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Monday Movie Mania

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

Join us for an epic movie marathon!

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Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Argenta Golden Agers

Jul
28

Monday, July 28, 2014

Program for Senior Adults. Music,Movies,Games and Activities. Call Julie at 687-1061 for information.

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
29

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
29

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
29

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Jul
29

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
29

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
30

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
30

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
30

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
30

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Babytime

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Babies, ages 6 months to 2 years, and their caretakers will enjoy stories, songs, and fingerplays.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Jul
31

Thursday, July 31, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

More Info

August, 2014

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
1

Friday, August 01, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
1

Friday, August 01, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Teen Gaming

Aug
1

Friday, August 01, 2014

Join us for a day of gaming on the PS3 and Wii! Must have a library card and be between the ages of 12-18 to participate!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
2

Saturday, August 02, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
2

Saturday, August 02, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Teen Gaming

Aug
2

Saturday, August 02, 2014

Join us for a day of gaming on the PS3 and Will. Must have a library card and be between the ages of 12-18 to participate.

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ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Aug
2

Saturday, August 02, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
3

Sunday, August 03, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
3

Sunday, August 03, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
4

Monday, August 04, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
4

Monday, August 04, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Aug
4

Monday, August 04, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Aug
4

Monday, August 04, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
5

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
5

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Aug
5

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Aug
5

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
6

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
6

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Aug
6

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Aug
6

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Twinkle Twinkle Baby Lap-sit Storytime (Argenta Branch)

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Baby Lap-sit Storytime is a program to encourage interaction between parents/caregivers and their baby (birth-18months). During the program we will learn simple nursery rhymes, songs and enjoy short stories. Parents are welcome to bring a small blanket for their baby to sit or lie on during the program, if they choose to be on the floor.

More Info

Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Aug
7

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
8

Friday, August 08, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
8

Friday, August 08, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Breakfast)

Aug
8

Friday, August 08, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast & lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

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Teen Gaming

Aug
8

Friday, August 08, 2014

Join us for a day of gaming on the PS3 and Wii! Must have a library card and be between the ages of 12-18 to participate!

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Summer Food Service Program presented by the NLR Parks & Recreation (Lunch)

Aug
8

Friday, August 08, 2014

The NLR Parks & Recreation will provide breakfast and lunch for children ages 18 and under at the Argenta Branch Library. Breakfast will be served from 9am to 10am. Lunch will be served from 11am to 1pm. All children are welcome!

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
9

Saturday, August 09, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
9

Saturday, August 09, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Good Gardens (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
9

Saturday, August 09, 2014

Join us the first Saturday of each month for Good Gardens, our once-a-month series of DIY projects and lectures. It is free and open to the public. August Speaker: Lori Spencer The Arkansas Butterfly Lady. Join us for a family friendly program.

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
9

Saturday, August 09, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

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ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Aug
9

Saturday, August 09, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

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"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
10

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
10

Sunday, August 10, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

"Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb" Exhibition

Aug
11

Monday, August 11, 2014

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 explores the ways that Americans experienced the atomic threat as part of their daily lives. Curated by Michael Scheibach and ExhibitsUSA, the show features more than 75 original objects from the era.

Americans were flooded with messages about the dangers of atomic weapons and attack from foreign powers through pamphlets, household objects, media, and film. Although the threat of atomic annihilation eventually drifted to the background of American consciousness in the late 1960s, the Atomic Age left a legacy of governmental response and civic infrastructure that remains relevant today.

The exhibition first presents a timeline and overview of the story, explaining the three main chronological phases of America?s Atomic Age. The Blast, 1945?1950 covers the years immediately following Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the American response split between popular consensus that the bomb had helped win World War II and a growing realization that this weapon could destroy the earth. Under the Mushroom Cloud, 1951?1956 shows how the situation changed after the Soviets acquired atomic capabilities in 1949. This new threat ushered in the Cold War and the age of Civil Defense. Nuclear Fallout, 1957?1965 describes the American response after the Soviets launched Sputnik in October 1957. The best Americans could do was build a fallout shelter or keep an evacuation map in their car, ready to get out of harm?s way.

With the timeline established, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow then looks more closely at the way Americans actually received these ?atomic messages.? The exhibition encourages audiences to explore four spheres of daily life and learn how civic, commercial, and government agencies targeted different groups with different kinds of media and messages. Taken together, these four thematic areas?at home, at school, in the community, and at play?show how thoroughly the messages permeated every aspect of society.

The thematic journey begins in At Home with ?The Bomb?, where federal pamphlets, radio announcements, and newspapers brought a steady stream of warning and words of encouragement to families. In contrast, mass merchandisers found new opportunities for using atomic imagery to add excitement to products and packaging. Children?s experiences are the special focus of ?Atomics? at School. From textbooks to ?duck and cover? drills, the impact of the Atomic Age in the schoolyard is one of the most indelible memories of childhood for many Baby Boomers. Civil Defense and Community includes a closer look at the activities of the Civil Defense agency and the Ground Observer Corps. The extension of atomic messages into the workplace, city or country, and into the nation?s transportation infrastructure is also explored. In contrast to the other thematic areas, the final section?At Play in the Atomic Age?takes a more lighthearted look at how the country reacted to atomic threats through leisure activities. From comic books to monster movies and ray guns, we see in this section that our consumer culture created an alternate set of coping mechanisms for a nation constantly under siege from messages of pending atomic annihilation.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
11

Monday, August 11, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Computer Literacy Class

Aug
11

Monday, August 11, 2014

Intro to Microsoft Word (1 P.M.-2 P.M.). This free, hands on, 1 hour long class covers Microsoft Word and its many uses. There is a limit of 5 students per hour-long class. If interested, please contact the library at (501) 687-1061.

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Computer Literacy Class

Aug
11

Monday, August 11, 2014

Internet and Computer FAQ (2 P.M.-3 P.M.). This free, hands on, 1 hour long class covers students' questions about the internet or computers. There is a limit of 5 students per hour-long class. If interested, please contact the library at (501) 687-1061.

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The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
12

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

More Info

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
13

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Innovation Hub presents: Hub-UB

Aug
13

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Come listen to experts speak about drone technology.

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The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
14

Thursday, August 14, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Job Seekers Clinic

Aug
14

Thursday, August 14, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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Live at Laman Featuring Billy Jones Bluez

Aug
14

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Modern and traditional southern soul, funk/rock and urban contemporary blues is coming to Live at Laman this month when Billy Jones joins us with his entire band!

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The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
15

Friday, August 15, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Argenta Art Walk Featuring Pottery by Celia Storey

Aug
15

Friday, August 15, 2014

Artist demonstration at the Argenta Branch library during the Argenta Art Walk in downtown North Little Rock. This month's featured artist is potter Celia Storey who teaches at the Arkansas Arts Center. Learn more about Celia by visiting her website: http://www.getrealpottery.com.

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The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America

Aug
16

Saturday, August 16, 2014

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America features 15 quilts in varying styles, created by artists who are actively producing work today. Hailing from 14 different states, the artists featured in the exhibition boast diverse backgrounds and paths that led them to textile art. Some began quilting and sewing in their youth, while others did not pursue the art form until adulthood. Many learned the craft at home, creating practical blankets for their families. Others are academically trained artists who chose textiles as their primary medium.

Bonnie LeBeaux, for example, is a Native American artist based in South Dakota who creates traditional, hand-crafted star quilts. The artistry of the star quilt was first introduced to Northern Plains Indians by missionaries in the late 1800s and ultimately led to the replacement of the sacred buffalo robe used for tribal ceremonies and special occasions. Star quilts are often intended to honor and protect the person for whom they are made. LeBeaux?s hand-crafted designs, including Ano Peta (Morning Fire), which is featured in the show, reflect the techniques, stories, and symbolism that were passed down from generations before her.

Erick Wolfmeyer of St. Louis, on the other hand, attended art school and was professionally trained in photography before taking on quilting later in life. Merging utility with beauty, Wolfmeyer?s works reinterpret traditional quilt patterns and are inspired by the landscape and colors of the rural Midwest.

Longtime fiber artist Dottie Moore, who resides in South Carolina, describes her nature-inspired quilts as ?visual conversations with fabric and thread to explore the mysteries of earth and sky.? Moore?s pieces, which are completed without the use of sketches or pattern, often feature trees, pathways, and mountains. On display in The Sum of Many Parts is Moore?s Metamorphasis, a striking quilt that took ten years to finalize by combining layers of hand-painted fabric, cotton batting, and machine embroidery.

As a whole, the exhibition highlights a range of quilting styles and techniques while providing an opportunity for assorted audiences to connect with American culture through our shared love of textile arts.

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America is curated by Teresa Hollingsworth and Katy Malone of South Arts, Atlanta, GA. The exhibition was adapted from a larger exhibition titled The Sum of Many Parts: 25 Quiltmakers in 21-Century America, which toured throughout China in 2012 and 2013.

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
16

Saturday, August 16, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

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ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Aug
16

Saturday, August 16, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
19

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

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"Fit 2 Live" at Laman! Presents, "What's Your Type? Diabetes and You"

Aug
19

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Join NLR's "Fit 2 Live" program the third Tuesday of each month at 6:30pm in the auditorium. Led by "Fit 2 Live" coordinator, Bernadette Rhodes, this program will introduce patrons to all things health! Featuring special speakers, films, demonstrations, and tips!

This month, join Leigh Delavan, Clinical Dietician from Arkansas Children's Hospital, as we learn budget-friendly ways to focus on how all foods can be incorporated into a ?diabetic? diet, including frozen, canned, in-season, etc.

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Twinkle Twinkle Baby Lap-sit Storytime (Argenta Branch)

Aug
21

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Baby Lap-sit Storytime is a program to encourage interaction between parents/caregivers and their baby (birth-18months). During the program we will learn simple nursery rhymes, songs and enjoy short stories. Parents are welcome to bring a small blanket for their baby to sit or lie on during the program, if they choose to be on the floor.

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Job Seekers Clinic

Aug
21

Thursday, August 21, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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The Laman Library System:

Main Library

2801 Orange Street
North Little Rock, AR 72114
Phone: 501-758-1720
Map & Directions  •  Hours

Argenta Branch

420 Main Street
North Little Rock, AR 72114
Phone: 501-687-1061
Map & Directions  •  Hours